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Posted by on Mar 22, 2016 in Pregnancy, Pregnancy Tips | 0 comments

Pregnancy Facts

Pregnancy Facts

Pregnancy brings with it a lot of anxiety for an expectant mother especially pregnancy facts. This anxiety is mostly the result of curiosity over pregnancy related problems. ‘Curiosity kills’ goes the saying. This stands true, especially in the context of pregnancy.

Though a pregnancy calendar can be a good guide for you throughout those nine special months, but you cannot rely on it to tell you the actual date of delivery. No matter how carefully you have drafted your birth plan, your baby may be determined to ignore all those plans. Therefore, you must carefully watch out for the labor signs and symptoms.

Pregnancy is a wondrous miracle for most women – until they experience the first bout of morning sickness about six weeks after conception. Experts have not determined what it is precisely that causes morning sickness and pregnancy nausea, but this physical reaction to the substantial changes a pregnant woman’s body goes through is not surprising.

Teen pregnancy has become a pandemic in a country that has the means to prevent it. Education is often the best answer and spending more money on programs that help to educate kids can help to prevent the rise in numbers of teen pregnancy. Providing contraceptives to teens can help to combat the problem, and spending more time educating them and helping them understand the risks not just of pregnancy, but also of sexually transmitted diseases can help to deter kids from intercourse. While there is never a cut and dry answer to any nationwide problem, bringing the facts and statistics to the forefront of the debate will help to find a solution.

Teen pregnancy has become a pandemic in a country that has the means to prevent it. Education is often the best answer and spending more money on programs that help to educate kids can help to prevent the rise in numbers of teen pregnancy. Providing contraceptives to teens can help to combat the problem, and spending more time educating them and helping them understand the risks not just of pregnancy, but also of sexually transmitted diseases can help to deter kids from intercourse. While there is never a cut and dry answer to any nationwide problem, bringing the facts and statistics to the forefront of the debate will help to find a solution.

Exercise is also a big help. It doesn’t have to be hard to exercise, a light jog a slow walk can in sense practice your body for the extra work it does. But remember, a balance of exercise and rest is needed as too much exercise or too much rest can also increase fatigue.

Make sure your doctor or midwife is aware you have herpes, and know of your medical history with the disease. This includes medication, average frequency of outbreaks, and severity of outbreaks. This will allow your doctor or midwife to take the right precautions during birth to minimise the risk of spreading the virus to the child.

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