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Posted by on Dec 8, 2017 in Pregnancy, Health | 0 comments

Eating for a Healthy Pregnancy

Eating for a Healthy Pregnancy

If you eat a normal, healthy diet you won’t need to make big changes when you’re pregnant. With only a few exceptions, most of the additional nutrition needs of pregnancy can be met by eating a well-balanced and varied diet.

Aim to include each day: Plenty of protein – ideally a serving of meat, fish, cheese or egg (free range if possible – we prefer happy chickens!). Don’t forget vegetable proteins too – such as beans, lentils, quinoa or tofu.
Plenty of carbohydrates – which can be found in cereal, breads, pasta and savoury biscuits (note the word savoury here – we’re not suggesting a packet of custard creams!). It’s better if you choose wholegrains such as wholewheat bread and pasta or brown rice. And don’t forget millet, oats, rye, spelt, barley corn, quinoa and buckwheat.

At least five to six portions of fruit and vegetables – go for the ‘rainbow’ with fruit and veg of many colours. Try for a good spread of dark green, leafy vegetables, root vegetables and plenty of fruit.

Include calcium rich foods. Dairy products such as cheese, milk, yogurt and fromage frais are the obvious choice but don’t forget, calcium can be found in green leafy vegetables, small fish with bones (such as sardines), tofu, beans, nuts and seeds.

Greens, potatoes, chickpeas, wholegrains, sweetcorn, broccoli and soya milk all contain essential folic acid – try and eat two servings a day during the first trimester.

And stay hydrated – we would recommend six to eight medium glasses of filtered or mineral water

The digestive system in pregnant women changes and becomes more efficient at absorbing certain nutrients. You won’t need to boost your calorie intake until the third trimester and then only by around 300 extra calories a day.

Research has shown that following a calorie controlled diet and reducing the amount of weight gain during pregnancy can help reduce the risk of complications whilst loading on the pounds can cause serious health problems. Remember, ‘Eating for two’ doesn’t mean you should eat twice as much food!

The digestive system in pregnant women changes and becomes more efficient at absorbing certain nutrients and you won’t need to boost your calorie intake until the third trimester and then only by around 300 extra calories a day. Research has shown that following a calorie controlled diet and reducing the amount of weight gain during pregnancy can help reduce the risk of complications whilst excessive weight gain can cause serious health problems.

Alexandra McCabe is a founder of FittaMamma, the healthy pregnancy experts. FittaMamma is a free resource to help women enjoy an active pregnancy with workout videos, recipes and step by step yoga guides. Read here for tips on what to eat when you’re pregnant and how to enjoy a healthy prenatal diet

 

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